Saturday, April 14, 2012

M is for Mind


I'd planned to write about metadiscourse for my "M" posting. Don't yawn. It's really an interesting topic. However, a good friend (thank you, Christina) sent me a link to a very interesting article in the New York Times. It has to do with how your mind processes words.

This is so cool. Brain scans have shown that when detailed descriptions, an evocative metaphor, or an emotional exchange is read our brains are stimulated.

Now wait a minute. I know that some of you are saying, "No duh. That's why romances are so popular."

Wait for it . . .

 This article says that our minds process words that make us think about smells and brings about a response not only from our language processing area, but also those dealing with smell. But that's not all.

Words that describe motion also stimulate areas of the brain. This supports the premise that it's important to use active verbs that create an image such as: grasped and kicked.

Another very interesting find was that ". . . . the brain does not make a distinction between reading about an experience and encountering it in real life." Isn't that fascinating? That only goes to show how important good, solid writing is in terms of connecting with our readers.

If you're interested in making your writing stronger and come to life, you should read this article.

Okay, what author do you think uses great descriptions and active verbs that really draws in readers?






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12 comments:

  1. Kimberley G. Little (she writes middle grade and young adult) does a fantastic job of using 'sensory' words. In THE HEALING SPELL, I swear I could feel that baby alligator.

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    1. I've heard of her book, but haven't read it. I'll definitely put it on my list. Thanks. And thank you for sharing the article with me. :) It's a topic I want to study more about.

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  2. I agree. All writers should think about this information. Thanks.

    Stopping by from the Challenge. Hope you'll visit back.

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    1. Thelmaz,
      I agree with you, this is information every writer needs to be aware of to help their writing. Thanks for stopping by.

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  3. Yes, that is interesting. I'm not surprised though - I love all the emotions I feel when reading.

    Have a lovely weekend. :)

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    1. Michelle,
      I guess it boils down to sensory detail. Writers need to use their senses more often when writing so their readers will experience the book as though they were living... it especially since the brain seems to signal that they are. So cool!

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  4. Good post today Kathi, I have always felt like I was there when I read a really good book like one by Jody Hedlund, Beverly Lewis,Cindy Woodsmall oh so many authors that write great stories for us to read. we have been discussing this over on goodreads.com recently.
    Paula O

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    1. Paula,
      I know what you mean. I've read Jody's books. She does a great job. I'll have to read one of Cindy's book, since you recommended her. Thanks for stopping by.

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  5. Talk about virtual reality! I'm trying to visit all the A-Z Challenge Blogs this month. My alphabet is at myqualityday.blogspot.com

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    1. Wow. That a great goal. Good luck with it. And thanks for stopping by my blog.

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  6. I thought my latest read by Jaci Burton was really well written but I'm not familiar with too many authors, I know. I haven't been reading very much. Thanks for following.

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    1. Jackie,
      I haven't read Jaci Burton. I'll have to put her on my list to check out.

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